Category Archives: Public Works


Eastern Avenue Construction and TTC Diversion

Eastern Avenue will be reduced to one westbound lane from January to December 2015.

This closure is needed to replace aging water infrastructure and to create a sidewalk on the north side of Eastern Ave.

Work will take place from 7AM to 7PM however, installation of the TTC streetcar tracks will require some overnight work.

The 143 Beach Express Bus will also be diverted.

 

For more information please use the following contact information.

City Contact:  

Easan Vallipuram (Project Manager)

416-338-5548

evallip@toronto.ca

 

TTC Contact: 

Diego Sinagoga (Community Liaison)

416-393-2197

diego.sinagoga@ttc.ca

Dundas and Kingston Road Parkette Design Released

As a result of the work planned on Kingston Road this summer, a new parkette at the corner of  Kingston Road and Dundas will be constructed. The corner will be redesigned to be safer for pedestrians, driver and cyclists and new seating and green space will be installed. A public meeting was held last fall with local residents, the Councillor and planning staff.

Please let us know what you think!

Below are the conceptual drawings for the newly designed corner.
Kingston and Dundas Parkette Design

The Ashbridges Park Skatepark-Bowl is Almost Ready

The new bowl at the Ashbridges Skatepark is almost finished. Contractors have finished the skate ledges, pathway and the perimeter fence. If the weather holds up, the skate bowl should be finished this year.

The Skate bowl has been poured and is almost ready for use.

New Baseball Diamond in Kew Gardens

Great news, the baseball diamond in Kew Gardens is finished.

New sub-drains have been installed to stop flooding as well as fresh soil and sod. The protective fencing will remain for another month or so until the ground freezes.

The new baseball diamond in Kew Gardens.

Toronto public works legend R.C. Harris profiled at the Market Gallery

The Market Gallery will present an exhibition marking the 100th anniversary of Roland Caldwell Harris’s appointment as the Commissioner of Works for the City of Toronto.

“The Water Czar: R.C. Harris Works for Toronto, 1912-45″ will run from September 15, 2012 to March 2, 2013. The exhibition will chronicle his unprecedented and unmatched 33-year career as head of the City’s works department through archival photos, maps and plans, and by artifacts rarely or never seen before.

“This exhibition is a wonderful tribute to a remarkable city builder,” said Councillor Michael Thompson (Ward 37 Scarborough Centre), Chair of the City’s Economic Development Committee. “When Torontonians drink a glass of tap water or cross the Prince Edward Viaduct, they are benefiting from his work.”

Harris became Commissioner in 1912 after a series of water-related scandals caused the City Engineer to resign. Appointed for his administrative ability more than for his technical acumen, Harris quickly developed a civic vision that viewed public works as the cornerstone of a greater Toronto.

Harris spent over three decades tackling Toronto’s water challenges – bridging it, making the harbour accessible, obtaining a secure supply of tap water and getting rid of the city’s wastewater. When he died in office in 1945, Toronto was a safer, healthier, better functioning and more beautiful place. Toronto’s Prince Edward Viaduct and art deco architectural gem the R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant are two of his legacies.

This exhibition is sponsored by international engineering firm CH2M HILL. In Canada, this company’s history includes merging with Gore, Nasmith and Storrie, a Toronto-based company that worked closely with Harris through his career.

The Market Gallery is a program of City of Toronto’s Cultural Services. It presents exhibitions dedicated to Toronto’s art, culture and history and offers educational programs for school groups and adults. Located on the second floor of South St. Lawrence Market, 95 Front St. E., the gallery is open Tuesday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Visit: http://www.toronto.ca/culture/the_market_gallery.htm

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